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Call for papers: History of Education & Children’s Literature

Call for papers – Special Issue of «History of Education & Children’s Literature» n. 1, 2019: «Memories and Public Celebrations of Education in Contemporary Times»

Proposals in English (between 500 and 1000 words) are to send before 30th September 2017 to: roberto.sani@unimc.it.

Notification of acceptance or refusal will be communicated on 30th November 2017.

Please find attached the call for papers, the submission form and the journal’s editorial guidelines.

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Call for papers: Queer(y)ing the World

CFP: Queer(y)ing the World: International LGBTQ+ Literature for Young Readers

In the past few decades in English-speaking countries, we’ve seen a major increase to the number of children’s and young adult books published featuring LGBTQ+ themes. But what is the situation like in other languages and other cultures?

In this edited collection, we aim to explore LGBTQ+ literature for young readers around the world, particularly beyond the English-speaking countries/cultures. By LGBTQ+, we include: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer, kink, intersex, non-monogamy, and more. We are interested in the intersection of literature, history, and politics, and we hope the various chapters will explore topics such as but not limited to:

  • How are sexualities and gender identities depicted in writing and illustration for younger readers? How are queer families and the construction of queer families portrayed?
  • How is this depiction influenced by the way the culture in question views queer identities?
  • What is the connection between LGBTQ+ rights and literature for children and young adults?
  • Who is writing this work and why?
  • Which companies are publishing the works?
  • What genres are these texts?
  • How do words and images interact in these books, if relevant?
  • How do LGBTQ+ identities intersect with other aspects of identity, including but not limited to ‘race’/ethnicity, dis/ability, class background, size, religion, and so on?
  • Are these works getting translated to other languages or are they themselves translations?
  • Are there different types of works being written by different groups within the cultures/countries?
  • What is the response of young readers (and parents, teachers, and other older readers) to the books?
  • How do libraries and library workers engage with these works?
  • How has the literature changed over time?
  • What sort of work remains to be done in this field?

Please submit an abstract of 300-500 words by 30 April 2017. We will reply with an acceptance or rejection of the abstract and feedback in the early summer and we anticipate that the due date for the submission of complete articles will be at the end of 2017. Articles will be 5000-7000 words, unless otherwise agreed upon. Guidance on style and referencing will be offered in due course. Abstracts and chapters should be in English, and any quotes in other languages should be translated as necessary.

Please contact Dr B.J. Epstein at b.epstein@uea.ac.uk and Dr Liz Chapman at e.chapman@sheffield.ac.uk with questions or to submit abstracts.

Call for papers: Translation Studies and Children’s Litterature

Translation Studies and Children’s Litterature, Current topics and Future perspectives

Since the publication of pioneering works by Göte Klingberg, Riitta Oittinen and Zohar Shavit in the 1970s and 1980s, the translation of children’s literature has attracted the attention of many scholars in various fields. On 19 and 20 October 2017, KU Leuven and the University of Antwerp (Belgium) will organise an interdisciplinary conference on Translation Studies and Children’s Literature that aims to investigate the intersection between translation studies and children’s literature studies, offer a state of the art of current trends in the study of children’s literature in translation, and consider future perspectives for this field. How can the concepts, methods and topics used to study children’s literature contribute to the field of Translation Studies? What research questions are opened up by studying children’s books from a Translation Studies perspective? And what potential avenues have only recently been opened up, or remain as yet uncovered? The conference will take place on the occasion of the academic retirement of Prof. dr. Jan Van Coillie (University of Leuven), a pioneer in this area of study.

Topics

We welcome proposals on topics relating to promising lines of research integrating Translation Studies and Children’s Literature Studies, including:

  • globalisation/localisation/glocalisation (including English as a lingua franca)
  • ideological shifts in the translation process
  • ethical aspects of translating children’s literature
  • the reception of translated children’s books
  • the role of institutions and mediators (translators, publishers, agents, critics etc.)
  • intermedial translation (including digital picturebooks)
  • the benefits of applying literary approaches such as digital humanities or cognitive sciences to the study of children’s literature in translation
  • new impulses from established approaches such as stylistics, memory studies, genetic criticism or reception studies

The conference will be held in Brussels (19 October 2017) and Antwerp (20 October 2017) and will be preceded by a master class on translating Children’s Literature (for Dutch-speaking students) on 18 October 2017 in Brussels. The working language of the conference will be English although simultaneous interpreting can be provided upon request (please indicate in your proposal).

Keynote speakers

  • Gillian Lathey (University of Roehampton London, UK)
  • Cecilia Alvstad (University of Oslo, Norway)
  • Emer O’Sullivan (University of Lüneburg, Germany)
  • Jan Van Coillie (University of Leuven, Belgium)

Please send your proposals (300 words) by March 15th 2017 to Jack.McMartin@kuleuven.be. We will give notice by April 30th 2017. Read the full announcement here.

The organizing comittee

  • Elke Brems (University of Leuven)
  • Jan Van Coillie (University of Leuven)
  • Vanessa Joosen (University of Antwerp)

University of Leuven (Campus Brussels)

  • Hilde Catteau
  • Theresia Feldmann
  • Ellen Lambrechts
  • Jack McMartin
  • Erwin Snauwaert
  • Myrthel Van Etterbeeck
  • Ann Vlasselaers

University of Antwerp

  • Katrien Liévois
  • Frauke Pauwels
  • Aline Remael

The scientific comittee

  • Elke Brems (University of Leuven)
  • Jan Van Coillie (University of Leuven)
  • Luc Van Doorslaer (University of Leuven)
  • Vanessa Joosen (University of Antwerp)
  • Barbara Kalla (Wrocław University, Poland)
  • Cees Koster (Utrecht University, The Netherlands)
  • Helma Van Lierop (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)
  • Monika Wozniak (Sapienza University Rome, Italy)

Call for Papers:  Children in Popular Culture

Red Feather Journal, an online, peer-reviewed, international and interdisciplinary journal, seeks well-written, critical articles on children in popular culture for the Spring 2017 issue -deadline April 30, 2017.  Some suggested topics include: child or childhood imagery (film, television, digital media, art); children or childhood literature; the child in/and fan cultures or gaming cultures; children and social media; childhood geography or material culture; children and war; children as refugees; children and the changing political landscape; or any other aspect of the child in popular culture.

Red Feather Journal welcomes and encourages international submissions that explore aspects of multi-cultural, transnational, or non-Western childhoods.

Red Feather Journal is published twice a year, in Spring and Fall. Authors are welcome to submit articles in any accepted documentation system, including Chicago, MLA, APA. Red Feather Journal is indexed through EBSCO host and MLA bibliography.

Interested contributors please submit the full article, an abstract, and a brief biography (with full contact information) as attachments in Word (please do not send in PDF format) to debbieo@okstate.edu or olsond@moval.edu

Deadline for submissions for the Spring 2017 issue is April 30.

CFP: Harry Potter Studies

CFP: Harry Potter Studies—Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Conference

The Midwest PCA/ACA is pleased to announce the Harry Potter Studies Area. The Harry Potter Studies Area is seeking papers and panels on the Harry Potter series and franchise as it relates to popular culture. With 2017 as the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, the Area seeks to explore the ways in which Harry Potter has impacted popular culture. Topics may include but are not limited to Harry Potter and fandom, children’s and young adult literature, film, philosophy, religion, sociology, teaching, or youth culture.

Deadline for receipt of proposals is April 30, 2017.

Call for Papers: Post-communist Children’s Culture

Essays and reviews on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wrocław, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). More specifically, we are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.

Possible areas of investigation

  • reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility
  • childhood heritage
  • globalization vs. localization
  • children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project)
  • children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture
  • edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education
  • children’s culture and citizenship education
  • nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture
  • relations between children’s and adult media cultures
  • children’s books markets
  • promotion of children’s literature and culture

Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak and Mateusz Świetlicki by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.

Respectfully,
Guest Editors
Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (Institute of English Studies, University of Wroclaw)
and Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki (Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Wroclaw)

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Call for Papers: Cultural Representations of Transnational Childhoods

Cultural Representations of Transnational Childhoods. Day Seminar 13/5/2017, University of Wroclaw, organized by the Center for Young People’s Literature and Culture and the Center for Postcolonial Studies, Institute of English Studies, the University of Wroclaw, in collaboration with the Centre for European Studies, Australian National University

Call for Papers: MLA 2018

Calling Dumbledore’s Army: Activist Children’s Literature

Books can encourage children to question rather than accept the world as it is. Literature for young people can invite them to imagine a world where black lives matter, women’s rights are human rights, poverty does not limit one’s life choices, LGBTQ youth know they are loved, indigenous peoples’ rights are respected, the disabled have equal rights and opportunities, refugees find refuge, and climate change does not imperil life on this planet.

This guaranteed session (sponsored by the Children’s Literature Forum) examines children’s literature as a vehicle for social change. Subjects panelists might consider include (but are not limited to): Children as activists, books aligned with social movements, satire or humor as catalyst for change, the repurposing of children’s culture as means of expressing or inspiring adults’ activism. Papers may cover any country or historical period.

The panel will convene at the Modern Language Association Convention in New York, which will be held from January 4 to 7, 2018.

Send a one page abstract and  two page CV by March 15, 2017 to Philip Nel.

Call for Papers: International Research in Children’s Literature special issue

International Research in Children’s Literature special issue, Intergenerational Desire in Children’s Literature

Guest editors: Christophe Van Eecke and Lies Wesseling.

This special issue seeks to explore the diverse economies of intergenerational eroticism and sexuality that pervade children’s and young adult’s literature, both the books themselves and the dynamics between authors and readers.

There has always been speculation about Lewis Carroll’s and J.M. Barrie’s attitudes to children, while a well-known author like William Mayne was convicted of indecent assault. But what about the books themselves? Between author and child stands the book as mediator, which may speak about erotic or sexual relationships between adults and young persons, portray such relationships, or suggest them obliquely. Are such books tools for grooming a child, or can they also empower children’s own sexuality (a taboo topic in our culture)? How are such processes at work in the books themselves? How do young readers respond to such books? And how do authors put such books to use?

We want to explore the many ways in which children’s literature operates in the controversial area of intergenerational sex and eroticism. We welcome contributions on all aspects of this topic: articles on paedophile writers of youth literature and the sexual politics of their work; on children’s books about sexual or erotic relationships (“bonding”) between the generations; on the response of young readers to such books; on the erotic in children’s literature and its relation to the desires and needs of both author and reader, or on any other topic that illuminates this field. We especially welcome contributions that discuss little-known authors who write in non-English languages or contributions that reach out to other media and traditions such as the graphic novel for children, children’s films, new media and online publications (blogs, e-books), or the oral traditions of urban legend, fairy-tale, and children’s rhyme. Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.

Abstracts (300 words) and a short bio (150 words) should be submitted to irclspecialissue@gmail.com before 10 March 2017. Deadline for submission of full articles will be 31 May 2017. Following review, deadline for finalised articles will be 15 August 2017.

 

 

 

Call for papers IRSCL: Intergenerational Desire in Children’s Literature

Special issue of International Research in Children’s Literature:

Intergenerational Desire in Children’s Literature

Guest editors: Christophe Van Eecke and Lies Wesseling.

This special issue seeks to explore the diverse economies of intergenerational eroticism and sexuality that pervade children’s and young adult’s literature, both the books themselves and the dynamics between authors and readers.

There has always been speculation about Lewis Carroll’s and J.M. Barrie’s attitudes to children, while a well-known author like William Mayne was convicted of indecent assault. But what about the books themselves? Between author and child stands the book as mediator, which may speak about erotic or sexual relationships between adults and young persons, portray such relationships, or suggest them obliquely. Are such books tools for grooming a child, or can they also empower children’s own sexuality (a taboo topic in our culture)? How are such processes at work in the books themselves? How do young readers respond to such books? And how do authors put such books to use?

We want to explore the many ways in which children’s literature operates in the controversial area of intergenerational sex and eroticism. We welcome contributions on all aspects of this topic: articles on paedophile writers of youth literature and the sexual politics of their work; on children’s books about sexual or erotic relationships (“bonding”) between the generations; on the response of young readers to such books; on the erotic in children’s literature and its relation to the desires and needs of both author and reader, or on any other topic that illuminates this field. We especially welcome contributions that discuss little-known authors who write in non-English languages or contributions that reach out to other media and traditions such as the graphic novel for children, children’s films, new media and online publications (blogs, e-books), or the oral traditions of urban legend, fairy-tale, and children’s rhyme. Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.

Abstracts (300 words) and a short bio (150 words) should be submitted to irclspecialissue@gmail.com before 28 February 2017. Deadline for submission of full articles will be 31 May 2017. Following review, deadline for finalised articles will be 15 August 2017.

Naturally, we hope for a broad response from you!

 

Best wishes

Lies Wesseling

 

Prof.dr. E. Wesseling

Director Centre for Gender and Diversity

Department of Literature and Art

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Maastricht University

P.O. Box 616

6200 MD Maastricht

THE NETHERLANDS

T: 00-31-43-3883309/ 82669

F: 00-31-43-3884917

E: Lies.Wesseling@Maastrichtuniversity.nl

W: www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/cgd